Elder Law

Practice Areas Menu

Caring for the legal needs of a growing population of the elderly.

According to demographic statistics for Spokane County in 2018 , approximately 15 percent of the population is age 60 or older. Add to that the seven percent who are between the ages of 55 and 59, and that number increases to more than 20 percent. In fact, it is estimated that by 2035, the population of people over 65 will be greater than that of minors.

As we age, we experience many changes—but we may all too often forget to address the fact that our legal needs change too. At Tate Law Offices, PLLC in Liberty Lake, we help ensure that you are prepared for the changes that you or your elderly parent, grandparent, or other relative are facing or will soon face. Through our elder law practice, we help ensure that needs are met and that rights are protected.

What is elder law?

Elder law focuses on preparing an individual, or helping their family to plan, for their financial well-being and care. At Tate Law Offices, PLLC, we advocate for the legal needs and rights of the elderly in several areas, including:

  • Estate planning: It is never too late (or too early) to plan for the management and distribution of your estate upon your death. An estate plan ensures that your property and assets go to the people and/or charities you want while minimizing taxes.
  • Medicaid planning: There may come a time when costly nursing home or long-term care become necessary. We provide strategies to preserve assets without losing Medicaid eligibility. It is extremely important to work with an attorney who understands the complex Medicaid regulations and keeps abreast of the ever-changing laws. We can also assist with applying for Medicaid, if necessary and appropriate.
  • Long-term care: Private insurance is an alternative to Medicaid regarding long-term care and should be explored as part of an estate plan. We can help explain your options.
  • Power of attorney: We advise and assist you in power of attorney matters. The trusted person whom you designate then has the legal authority to make financial and medical decisions for you should you become incapacitated. Typically, there are two separate documents, one for medical power of attorney and one for financial power of attorney, and often, each with a different agent or attorney-in-fact.
  • Guardianship/conservatorship: These are complex and sensitive areas which the State of Washington takes very seriously. Attorney guidance is imperative.

We work to find the best possible solutions for your needs.

There is no “one-size-fits-all” solution when it comes to elder law. Talk to us. We can discuss all your situations and make sure that you are comfortable with your options. To schedule a consultation, please contact us online or call us at (509) 994-1599. We serve clients throughout Spokane County and surrounding areas.